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Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus isolated from various clinical samples at SSG hospital, Baroda | Abstract

Journal of Research in Medical and Dental Science
eISSN No. 2347-2367 pISSN No. 2347-2545

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Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus isolated from various clinical samples at SSG hospital, Baroda

Author(s): Rachana Bhavsar, N.J. Garala, R.N. Garala, Pooja Patel, T.B. Javadekar, Hiral Patel, Krunal Mehta

Abstract

Background: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial pathogen causing significant mortality and morbidity. It is associated with a wide spectrum of infections ranging from mild skin and soft tissue infections to life threatening sepsis. Infected and colonized patients are the main reservoirs of infection and hand carriage by health care workers is the predominant mode of transmission.

Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of MRSA and their susceptibility pattern at SSG hospital, Baroda.

Materials and Methods: 150 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained from different clinical specimens from hospitalized patients. They were screened for methicillin resistance by standard laboratory procedures. Susceptibility to beta lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, glycopeptides and Oxazolidinones were determined by disc diffusion method.

Results: Among the 150 Staphylococcus aureus isolates studied, 65 (43.3%) were MRSA. Among the 65 MRSA isolates are 96.93% susceptible to Vancomycin, 100% susceptible to Linezolid and 35.39% susceptible to Gentamicin, 12.31% susceptible to Azithromycin; 32.31% susceptible to Clindamycin and 00% susceptible to penicillin, oxacillin & cefoxitin.

Conclusion: The MRSA isolates were associated with a high degree of co-resistance to other groups of antimicrobial agents. Active screening and compliance with recommended infection control practices play an important role in the control of MRSA.

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